Integrated Plan

2017-19 Integrated Plan: Executive Summary

For further information regarding the Hartnell College 2017-19 Integrated Plan: Basic Skills Initiative, Student Equity, and Student Success and Support Program, please contact Kathy Mendelsohn, Dean of Academic Affairs, at kmendelsohn@hartnell.edu or at 831.755.6827

Integrated Goal 1: College Access Pathways • To increase student access to Hartnell College from all service areas groups 2017-19 Integrated Plan Activities for College Access Pathways: • To establish the physical and technological infrastructure to support user-friendly student access to and enrollment in Hartnell College • To use multiple measures, including high school GPAs (based on research-based decision trees) to assess and place students into English, math, and ESL courses • To provide clear guided academic and career pathways to students to accomplish their educational and career goals in a timely manner 2017-2019 Budgeted Resources: $623,314

2014-17 Integrated SSSP, SE, and BSI Access Goal:

To improve access for the target populations identified in the college research as experiencing a disproportionate impact Impacted Groups: Low-income students, Veterans, Whites, Males, Latinos, AB540 students, Foster Youth, TRiO, and EOPS students, Latinos, and students with disabilities Allocation: $915,069.20 Previous Access Activities Access Activity 1: Develop targeted financial aid information to specific populations across all district sites and promote the completion of the FAFSA, BOGW Fee Waiver and/or Dream Act Applications (Completed – Ongoing) • In collaboration with college and community partners, Hartnell College opened the Mi CASA Center in April 2016 to support AB 540/DACA/undocumented (Dreamer) students in achieving their educational and personal goals through direct services, advocacy, and opportunities for student leadership and engagement o Monthly workshops focusing on the specific needs of Dreamer students are also provided. o Hartnell College served 759 Dreamer students in 2015-16. In Monterey County, undocumented adults make up 13% of the population and 1 in 20 children in Monterey county is undocumented (5% of the total child population) o Hartnell College has created an institution-wide effort by developing a group of faculty, staff and administrator allies who have received training and are committed to serving Dreamer students, supported by a full-time program director, a programming assistant, and Student Affairs staff • Since November, Hartnell college has implemented a comprehensive support response for undocumented students and students from mixed-status families, including but not limited to: issuing a public statement of commitment to diversity, publishing a resource guide for undocumented students, passing a board resolution to support undocumented students and protect student privacy, updating student privacy policies and procedures, hosting an immigration town hall and forum, and issuing over 30 privately funded emergency scholarships for students seeking DACA renewal • A full-time Financial Aid Technician was hired in April 2016 to promote and assist in the completion of FAFSA and BOGW Fee Waiver applications o Between July 2017 and December 2017, 38 financial aid workshops and presentations were delivered to Hartnell and area high school students in both English (1,691 students) and Spanish (125 students) o Between July 2016 and June 2017, 116 financial aid workshops and presentations were delivered to Hartnell and area high school students in both English (2,790 students) and Spanish (223 students) o Financial aid information was included in College Pathway Coordinator presentations to area high school students at their high schools, to adult learners at area adult schools, and to parents (in both English and Spanish) during Panther Prep Day activities o In 2015-16, 184 parents participated in Panther Prep activities on both the Main Campus and King City Educational Center, where financial aid presentations were included; over 1,000 high school students completed the registration process, including FAFSA applications o Financial Aid TV (FATV) was funded in May 2016 and provided financial aid information to over 750 viewers in August 2016; recent viewership fluctuates (with approximately 300 videos watched in April 2017). Salinas is in the top five viewing locations for Hartnell financial aid information, with current students watching the majority of segments (parents and future students are tied for the second-most viewership; most videos are watched on desktops. FATV Reports are reviewed monthly • In academic year 2014-2015, Hartnell College hired two “College Pathways Coordinators” o coordinate with high schools, adult schools, community-based organizations, foster youth serving organizations, veteran serving organizations o provide college tours to future students o help ensure students are on an early preparation track to begin completing the Hartnell College “Steps to Success” process for enrollment one year prior to their actual enrollment o requires completion of the interactive online student orientation (available in English and Spanish) Access Activity 2: Increase marketing of academic and student support services offered by Hartnell College to students who may traditionally attend four-year universities or other community colleges and expand networks to include other disproportionately disadvantaged groups (Completed – Ongoing) • The College offers dual enrollment classes in area high schools, prisons, and jails o In Fall 2017, the College entered into an MOU with a private high school and began offering two transfer-level courses in art and engineering o Dual enrollment courses were offered at area high schools • In March 2017, the second section of the Soledad High School COU 1, Dual Enrollment (AB 288), course participated in its first Hartnell College visit • Twenty-seven students were enrolled in this section this spring semester and only two had ever been to the Main Campus • One of the objectives of this course is to facilitate the transition from high school to college • The students spent the school day participating in various activities including a guided tour, getting their student ID cards and receiving information from the Office of Student life, receiving a presentation by the TRiO/Student Support Services Program, visiting the Panther Learning Labs, participating in a campus scavenger hunt, and ending the day with a planetarium show • Piloted dual enrollment classes at Soledad High School include English (55 students), Counseling (55 students), Administration of Justice (38 students) o Transfer-level courses offered at the Salinas Valley State Prison and the Correctional Training Facility in Soledad • 6 courses Fall 16 (150 students); 10 courses Spring 17 (250 students) • Curriculum leading to AA/Transfer degrees in Psychology/Sociology • Courses offered include COU 1, THA 1, MUS 5, and HIS 17A • Transfer-level courses offered at the Monterey County Youth Facility • In Spring 2017, Hartnell College offered COU 1, Student Success Seminar, a course that teaches psychological, social, and physical principles and life management skills, to incarcerated youth • The partnership is a collaboration between the Counseling Department, the Academy for College Excellence (ACE) Program, and Monterey County Office of Education (MCOE) Alternative Education Programs • Twenty-five (25) youth in the Monterey County Youth Facility in Salinas who were scheduled for Summer 2017 release were enrolled in the course earned college credit, which can be applied towards high school graduation and is degree applicable • The goal is to enroll them full-time at Hartnell College in fall 2017 and eliminate recidivism by developing a pathway to higher education • A College Pathways Coordinator has conducted workshops, presentations, orientations, and one-on-one guidance to adult school students and other prospective adult learners from the community and has developed a pathway to college for non-traditional students • The College has been piloting Technology Readiness Courses (Levels 1, 2, and 3 in six-week, four-hour sessions) as part of its adult education offerings to train students in computer and Internet terminology and concepts, keyboarding, and basic computer applications o Course enrollment and completion rates continue to increase to approximately 35-40 students per session o Courses were offered in Spanish only as not-for-credit o These courses were submitted as noncredit curriculum to the Chancellors Office in Spring 2017 • The first annual Adult Education Professional Development Day in our area was held on October 27, 2017 o Sponsored by the Salinas Valley Adult Education Consortium of which Hartnell College is a member and the fiscal agent o Over 100 practitioners from four adult education consortia participated (Hartnell College faculty, staff, and administrators plus those from Santa Cruz County, the Monterey Peninsula, and the Gavilan region) o Workshop topics included Acceleration Strategies for Adult Learners, Career Pathways Development, Technology-Based Instruction for Adults, Adult Language Learning, and Interactive Activities for Intermediate/Advanced English Language Learners • The Hartnell Community College District has joined the Community College Equity Assessment Lab (CCEAL) National Consortium on College Men of Color (NCCMC) o Our participation in the NCCMC will enhance our commitment to improving the success of historically underrepresented and underserved students, including men of color o In 2016, Hartnell College launched the MILE program (Men's Institute for Leadership and Education) to support the men of Hartnell. Despite programs designed to enhance outcomes for men of color, in the United States only 17% and 15% of Black and Latino men, respectively, earn a certificate, degree, or transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in six years. Figures for men from other ethnic groups (e.g., Native American, Southeast Asian) also indicate an insurmountable need for improvement o The NCCMC facilitates an exchange of ideas between community colleges across the nation on how best to serve men of color in our educational institutions. Community colleges convene to share their efforts and learn about new strategies for enhancing the success of men of color • Summer ESL programming has included an ESL Institute and Summer Bridge Experience o In Summer 2017, a group of prospective ESL students participated in a week-long ESL Summer Bridge program to help prepare them for the fall semester • An ESL instructor and a College Pathways Coordinator organized activities to help participants apply, register, log on to PAWS and Canvas, locate key offices on campus, and meet ESL faculty with whom they will likely take classes • Hartnell staff (including ESL instructors, student tutors, counselors, an academic support specialist, and a program assistant) provided workshops on multiple topics including: financial aid, tutorial support, educational planning, crisis counseling, and disability services o The ESL Summer Institute was offered from Summer 2013 through Summer 2016 • The program focused on developing academic reading and writing skills for ESL students and increasing success and persistence in ESL and other courses • Each session required collaborative efforts by students to develop and present small group research projects focusing on current event topics • After analysis, the ESL faculty have piloted the ESL Summer Bridge Experience to focus on college readiness/success skills Access Activity 3: Develop in-depth customized orientation segments tailored to disproportionately impacted groups, to include orientations and workshops for parents in English and in Spanish (Completed – Ongoing) • In February 2017, EOPS hosted a presentation, “Supporting Undocumented Students to Graduate from College: Information, Resources and Best Practices” by the Director of Higher Education Initiative at Educators for Fair Consideration (E4FC) o An overview of AB 540, AB 2000, the CA Dream Act, DACA was presented and information was information on available scholarships for undocumented students • In February 2017, the Hartnell Community College District and the Office of Financial Aid hosted its annual Cash for College Workshops for all new and continuing students o Assists students in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or California Dream Act application o Approximately 90 students and parents attended the event; Hartnell’s financial aid and pathways teams have assisted over 1,000 students in the last four months in completing the 2017-2018 Federal financial aid application and State of California Dream Act applications. o The main target audience was high school seniors throughout our District as well as currently enrolled Hartnell students o Hartnell coordinated efforts with all of the high schools in South County, Salinas, and North County • In August 2017, Hartnell's Center for Achievement and Student Advancement (Mi CASA) hosted two DREAMer Student Welcome and Orientation sessions o DREAMer students participated in team building and learned critical information about resources and services available to them at Hartnell College o The goal of the event was to help DREAMer students at Hartnell develop a sense of community with one another, connect to campus resources, and become comfortable with the MiCASA staff o Participants surveyed rated the Orientation as "Excellent" (98%) and stated that the information was "Definitely" useful to them • In October 2017, Mi CASA Counselors launched an intensive outreach campaign in high schools and community organizations throughout the Salinas Valley to share updates and promote Mi CASA o A special California Dream Act Application Workshop for DREAMer students was offered in the new Mi CASA Student Center by Mi CASA and the Financial Aid Office o A workshop was conducted for nearly 30 parents attending the Gonzales Migrant parent meeting o A goal is to connect with prospective parents, educate families about the benefits of higher education and to increase the number of DREAMER students who complete the AB 540 Affidavit and the Dream Act Application prior to enrolling at Hartnell o Financial Aid staff provided hands on assistance along with Mi CASA Counselors • In November 2017, the Director of Adult Education filmed a segment for Univision 67 (interviewed by the Hartnell Director of Communications) about the offerings at Hartnell College for the Salinas Valley adult population o The segment was recorded in Spanish to reach out to the Latino community and remind them that Hartnell offers English as a Second Language and pathways towards completing a certificate or degree • The Fourth Annual Panther Prep Day took place during the last weekend in April 2017 o Panther Prep Day is Hartnell's official welcome event for local graduating seniors. o Annually, the Hartnell College Pathways Team helps seniors from over 17 local high schools to complete the key components of the Hartnell Steps to Success process of enrollment (Admissions Application, Orientation, Financial Aid Application, and Assessment) o During Panther Prep Days, students meet with a Hartnell College Counselor to develop their fall education plans and receive priority registration for fall classes o Updates to the event offered Counseling Sessions by meta-major, allowing students to have a better understanding of their major and career choice and the return of a Financial Aid session that included a “front counter” and open lab where student and parents received a check on their financial aid status o Participants included from Hartnell faculty, managers, staff, and students o During the 2017 event, 308 students participated in South Monterey County (King City), and over 500 Salinas-area students attended the Main Campus event, for a total of over 800 students registered for Summer and Fall 2017; in 2015, 227 students participated in South Monterey County (King City), and 724 students attended the Main Campus event, which was a 26 percentage point increase over attendees in 2013 • The Counseling Department will be working with Hanover Research to determine the impact of Panther Prep on the student success rates. • Each Spring since 2015, Hartnell College hosts groups of fourth graders from area school districts for Panther Cub Day o In May 2017, 200 Gonzales Unified School District fourth graders visited the Hartnell campus for the annual Panther Cub Day series of events (the annual Alisal Union School District Panther Cub took place in June) o In June 2015, more than 1,200 students visited from the Alisal Union School District o This yearly tradition is part of Hartnell’s collaboration with the Monterey County College Challenge (M3C) to build a college going culture in our community. o Throughout the school year, these fourth graders have received career and college exploration instruction; Panther Cub Day serves as the culminating event. o During their visit, future Panthers enjoyed a special performance by Theater and Cinema students, shared their goals of becoming dentists, veterinarians, teachers, and police officers, and had a tour of the campus where young Panthers interacted with Salinas Valley Health Professions Pathway students in Nursing and Allied Health classrooms. In addition, they also received presentations by the TRiO program and visited our Library's anatomical models • An additional DSP&S counselor was hired to increase capacity to serve the Alisal Campus and King City Center and offer learning disability assessment and services throughout the district. Services are also being extended to adult school partners Access Activity 4: Provide in-depth and well-rounded support to assist veteran students in completing all required certification documentation and in accessing educational planning, guidance, psychological and other follow-up services (Completed – Ongoing) • In 2016-2017 year, the Veteran’s Service Program was allocated Student Equity Program (SEP) funding to support the following: o a full-time Program Assistant II/Certifying Official position (25%) o a full-time Counselor position (50%) for the Veteran’s Center o expanded Veteran’s Center hours (a request from a 2015-16 Veteran Student Survey) o an increase in the Hartnell College student veteran population (unduplicated) of 170 percentage points from 2008-09 to 2015-16; the increase from 2014-15 to 2015-16 was 25 percentage points Access Activity 5: Develop ESL/Math Assessment Prep (EMAP) to prepare for the college’s assessment test (Piloted – Discontinued/Replaced with other multiple measure activities) • In 2015, In an attempt to determine the cause of inconsistencies with student placement, the Student Success Committee piloted an Accuplacer preparation workshop model. This included committee members taking the placement exam, discussing the process, implementing a workshop paradigm based on discussions, and follow-up conversations regarding success and obstacles. Workshop enrollment was low (on-campus recruitment was ineffective since those students were already assessed) o Accuplacer Prep workshops were discontinued and efforts were focused on developing decision trees for GPA placement in math and English; math and English faculty participate in CAP workshops o English and math faculty are focused on accelerated course development to encourage more students to advance through below-transfer sequences in less time o Faculty participate in grants and workshops that include the Basic Skills Student Outcome Transformation (BSSOT) grant, the California Acceleration Project (CAP), and the Carnegie Institute (Quantway and Statway) Access Activity 6: In coordination with EOPS, a Summer Boot Camp will support new incoming financially eligible students from high school to be familiar with what is expected as a college student and prepare them for first college experience (In Progress – Ongoing) • In August 2017, the Reading & Writing Academy was offered to students in one level and two levels below English to help prepare them for transfer-level English by teaching effective reading and writing strategies. The curriculum from the Academy is being considered for workshop or noncredit course development.

Data to Support 2015-16 Access Progress:

Gender Race/Gender/Special Group Access All Students American Indian/Alaska Native All Students Asian (including Filipino) All Students Asian (excluding Filipino) All Students Black or African/American All Students Filipino All Students Hispanic or Latino -5 All Students Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander All Students More than one race All Students Some other race N/A All Students White -4 All Students Unknown Race N/A All Students Males All Students Females -3 All Students Unknown Gender N/A All Students Current or former foster youth N/A All Students Individuals with disabilities -3 All Students Low-income students All Students Veterans -3 All Students Undocumented Students -3

Integrated Goal 2: Integrated Early and Academic Support (Course Completion) • To increase student persistence through the basic skills sequence and course completion to reach academic goals 2017-19 Integrated Plan Activities for Integrated Early and Academic Support (Course Completion): • To increase Early Support Program (ESP) activities to Hartnell College students to increase course-level completion • To increase academic support activities to increase student success in course, certificate, and degree completion 2017-2019 Budgeted Resources: $787,283

2015-16 Integrated SSSP, SE, and BSI Course Completion Goal: • To improve course completion (including ESL and basic skills) for the target populations identified in the college research as experiencing a disproportionate impact Impacted Groups: Foster Youth, American Indian/Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders, Black or African American, White, Individuals with disabilities, Males Allocation: $884,277.20 Previous Course Completion Activities Course Completion Activity 1: Develop professional learning workshops for faculty and staff to promote culturally responsive pedagogies and strategies to help impacted students learn and apply academic success strategies (In Progress - Ongoing) • In November 2017, members of the Hartnell Speech Team presented a literature performance showcase entitled “Pathways and Perspectives.” to highlight different student experiences and groups on campus, as well as introduce audience members to the concept of “grit” - the ability to persevere and overcome obstacles o Six members of the team presented short stories, poems and dramatic literature on the following: “Homeless and in College,” “Foster Youth in College,” “Challenges of a Machismo Background,” “Dreamer Students and College,” “Students with a Felony Background,” and “Grit: Pushing Through to Find Success” o After an hour of performances, several of the students participated with faculty and staff for a panel discussion, including the Director of Student Affairs, an English instructor, and the Director of Foster and Kinship Care Education o Forty-five audience members, primarily students, attended the program and panel. • In March 2017, nearly 90 faculty, staff, and managers convened at the 2017 Equity Summit, a kick-off event for the Equity Series at Hartnell College o Two morning sessions had roughly 70 participants from across the campus groups and focused on equity as a culture on campus. The afternoon session included 28 faculty members who worked on developing equity-based strategies to be implemented in the classroom o Participants were provided demonstrations and practical implementation discussions of two research-based practices that have been shown to boost learning and engagement for Latino/a students: small group learning and formative assessments o The opportunity to attend the ESCALA Summer Institute is extended to faculty. The mission of ESCALA is to support instructors as they improve underrepresented student outcomes in college through purposeful implementation of culturally responsive instruction. The faculty will be completing a project this fall to practice their new teaching techniques and measure the outcomes. They will continue meeting with ESCALA faculty coaches and will present the results of their project to ESCALA at the Annual Student Success Conference in January • College staff have participated in mental health training activities o To date, 93 students, faculty, and staff members have been certified in Mental Health First Aid (MHFA is a certification course offered from the National Council on Behavioral Health aimed at helping individuals identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illness and substance use disorders) o In May, 2017, Hartnell held several events as part of Mental Health Awareness Month: • A Resource Fair with Crisis Counseling and the Guardian Scholars programs, where stress balls were created for attendees and the Psychology Club encouraged the students to sign a stigma-free pledge • A presentation on “Success over Stigma” from Interim, Inc. • A film “Almost Sunrise,” about two combat veterans who make a cross country trek to help them deal with the side effects after returning from a war zone. o The Hartnell College's Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) has been launched. • The mission of the BIT is to proactively identify, track, assess, and offer a coordinated response to Hartnell community college members who display concerning behaviors on campus, in an effort to increase student success and campus safety • Hartnell College hosted the Salinas Valley Adult Education Consortium's first ever Salinas Valley Adult Education Community Partner Networking Event in March 2017 o Adult education agencies and other service providers from the Salinas Valley gathered to share and learn about the latest adult education services in the region and to connect with each other to build and strengthen partnerships o The event provided a rare opportunity for 27 organizations/districts/agencies and over 60 individual attendees to network and seek new ways to collaborate in order to better serve our region’s adults, families, and employers • In April 2017, Mi CASA organized a team of Hartnell Dreamer Allies to attend the Bay Area Community College Undocually Call to Action at Foothill College o Participants in the one-day event shared challenges and best practices for student services and college policies and procedures and learned about models throughout our region. o Stakeholders also collaborated with their peers from other institutions in developing action plans to address ongoing challenges. The Hartnell team included staff from Special Programs, Financial Aid, College Pathways, Counseling/Mi CASA, EOPS, and HEP) • In September 2014, Hartnell College began hosting the twice-yearly Student Success and Curriculum Institute among the college and area high schools o Topics include high school-college curriculum alignment, use of multiple measures for English, math, and ESL placement, dual enrollment, college readiness preparation, and best practices for student success o Over 100 high school and college faculty, counselors, and staff have consistently participated in the five Curriculum Institutes   Course Completion Activity 2: Establish Student Academic Support Services to provide academic support to impacted students to improve successful course completion (In Progress -Ongoing) • In October 2015, the new Director of Student Academic Support was hired and began steps towards implementing a full student academic support system • The Hartnell Panther Learning Lab opened in Fall 2016 o New Panther Learning Lab services have been expanded services to E217 (along with the existing operation in the Library, A214). In addition to the Director and the Tutorial Services Coordinator, three academic support specialists joined the team in June 2016. o In Spring 2016, services began to expand in the form of workshops, classroom presentations, drop-in tutoring, and tutoring in more academic areas. o Services are coordinated and provided at all three campus locations and include ESL conversation groups for all levels of ESL, supplemental instruction, and one-on-one and group tutoring o Collaboration occurs among instructors, Panther Learning Lab staff, Supplemental Instructors (Sis), tutors, and Early Support Program counselors and staff; e.g., development of a Lab-Tutoring Session Flowchart for writing tutoring o Early Support Program (ESP) and the Panther Learning Lab (PLL) collaborate on coordinate marketing and recruitment activities to both faculty and students o Through Student Equity, HSI, Basic Skills Transformation/Initiative funding, student academic support has been able to stabilize and develop a catalogue of services that has increased students served by approximately 150% o Drop in tutoring has significantly increased since the inception of the Panther Learning Lab (PLL) model. Unique visitors hovered in the 400 student range prior to the opening of the PLL. Since the PLL opened full time in Fall 2016, unique student visitors has ranged in the 1,100-1,200 range. Visits and contact hours have also increased from the 2,000-2,800 visits per semester to approximately 8,000 in each of Fall 2016 and Spring 2017. Hours spent in the PLL versus the tutorial Center are at nearly 9,000 from the 3,000 to 4,000 range per semester. o Supplemental Instruction usage has remained in a consistent range of 3,300 to 4,300 hours and 350 to 500 students per term. With the hiring of a part-time SI coordinator and implementation of math course leads, these numbers should increase in the 2017-18 year o Free online tutoring is offered through NetTutor and Canvas that can be accessed 24 hours a day, every day • The Panther Learning Lab has shown an increase in student participation and student success since providing tutoring and other academic support in 2015 o In Fall 2015, the unduplicated student count for drop-in tutoring was 603 students; in Fall 2016, the unduplicated student count for drop-in tutoring was 1,202 students, an almost 100 percentage point increase o Different strategies encouraged tutoring support access: Drop-in tutoring, Early Support Program, Athlete Study Hall, Sponsored Workshops, Course Assignment (in person and NetTutor) o In Fall 2016, 77% of students who participated in tutorial services were successful in their math classes; in Spring 2017, 83% of students who participated in tutorial services were successful in their math classes o In Fall 2016, 77% of students who participated in tutorial services were successful in their English classes; in Spring 2017, 88% of students who participated in tutorial services were successful in their English classes o Data show that 89% of students who receive tutoring persist to the next term • The following academic supports were provided to students in the following groups: Veterans, Foster Youth, EOPS, TRiO, and Dreamers (Lending Library also includes books for incarcerated students*):

Student Academic Supports 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 Meal vouchers $ 1,458 $ 7,450 $ 9,000 Calculator loans $ 6,000 $ 1,380 0 Lending Library* $15,000 $42,000 $90,000 Laptop loans $24,000 0 0

• The Early Support Program (ESP) was piloted in the fall 2013 semester and consisted of five instructional faculty members working with a part-time Early Support Counselor to identify students that needed support in the classroom. The initial focus was on students enrolled in Basic Skills courses o The program has 1 full-time counselor, several adjunct counselors and three program assistants (one at each of the College’s campuses) o Between Fall 2016 and Spring 2017he program assisted 2,554 students through counseling sessions, phone calls, and walk-in appointments • The Early Support Program (ESP) provides counseling and support for students placed on academic probation and who have been dismissed o Worked with between 80-100 students to assist them in the petition process for readmission after dismissal • Assist with the application essay (60-70% students have been readmitted) • Provide workshops regarding academic standards • Schedule 3 follow-up counseling appointments o Assisted approximately 1,200 students who are in Level 1, Level 2, or Level 3 probation status through workshops o Evaluated processes for effectiveness/efficiency and determined that ESP should focus on academic probation issues and General Counseling should focus on academic dismissal issues • The Early Support Program (ESP) and the Panther Learning Lab (PLL) host Study-A-Thon events for students preparing for final exam preparation every semester (since Spring 2016) o The event’s main focus was giving a greater number of students’ exposure to Hartnell's Panther Learning Labs, which will be providing extended hours for students during finals o Students were provided with childcare, free printing and meals by EOPS and Student Life o Students received a variety of academic support (tutoring and supplemental instruction, small study groups, and faculty-lead review sessions), provided with informative material regarding mental health awareness, and had access to counseling services provided by ESP o The Study-A-Thon accommodated over 1,000 students during this week-long event at the Main Campus, King City Education Center, and Alisal campus • Summer ESL programming has included an ESL Institute and Summer Bridge Experience o In Summer 2017, a group of prospective ESL students participated in a week-long ESL Summer Bridge program to help prepare them for the fall semester • An ESL instructor and a College Pathways Coordinator organized activities to help participants apply, register, log on to PAWS and Canvas, locate key offices on campus, and meet ESL faculty with whom they will likely take classes • Hartnell staff (including ESL instructors, student tutors, counselors, an academic support specialist, and a program assistant) provided workshops on multiple topics including: financial aid, tutorial support, educational planning, crisis counseling, and disability services o The ESL Summer Institute was offered from Summer 2013 through Summer 2016 • The program focused on developing academic reading and writing skills for ESL students and increasing success and persistence in ESL and other courses • Each session required collaborative efforts by students to develop and present small group research projects focusing on current event topics • After analysis, the ESL faculty have piloted the ESL Summer Bridge Experience to focus on college readiness/success skills In May 2017, a group of faculty, staff and administrators at Hartnell college was formed to create a comprehensive support system for improving retention and success for African American male student-athletes with a specific emphasis on those coming from out of state o The group began by examining data and successful models for supporting African American male student athletes o The goal is to develop a detailed Action Plan with long-term goals to include an expanded mandatory orientation program for new students, a first-year experience program, peer mentors, scholarships, meal plans for eligible students, and comprehensive academic support services o Beginning in Spring 2017, Panther Learning Lab staff and athletic coaches have collaborated to require student athletes to attend Panther Learning Lab tutoring sessions • The Basic Skills Progress Tracker has shown increased success and persistence rates in the English and math sequences since the college has received student success funding and implemented student success activities; the data show a decrease in success in transfer-level English for ESL students: Basic Skills Progress Tracker Fall 2014-Spring 2017 Fall 2012-Spring 2015 +/- (Increase/Decrease) English Success in two-levels below 79% 78% +1 percentage point Success in one-level below 81% 78% +3 percentage points Success in transfer level 81% 75% + 6 percentage points Math Success in two-levels below 80% 74% + 6 percentage points Success in one-level below 83% 78% + 5 percentage points Success in transfer level 82% 77% + 5 percentage points ESL Success in two-levels below 88% 93% - 5 percentage points Success in one-level Below 88% 88% + 0 percentage points Success in Transfer Level 65% 81% - 16 percentage points o ESL faculty have developed and submitted four noncredit ESL courses to the Chancellor’s to facilitate students’ progress through the ESL sequence o Math faculty have developed and submitted noncredit math courses to the Chancellor’s Office to facilitate students’ progress through the math sequence o Math faculty have developed and are offering math courses to non-STEM majors to facilitate students’ progress through the math sequence o English faculty are investigating curriculum revisions to facilitate students’ progress through the English sequence; Panther Learning Lab sessions are required assignments for pilot sections in one-level below English courses • A Guardian Scholars Coordinator was hired in Fall2015; the position was vacated and replaced and since vacated. Needs were reassessed and the position to work with foster aid youth has been redesigned as a program assistant and is in the recruitment process. o This position will support priority registration, program referrals, textbook lending, school supplies support, food, laptop lending, student workshops, and community resource referrals to foster youth o Goals are to increase foster youth enrollment by 5%/year, increase foster youth retention by 2% each year, increase foster youth applications to UC/CSU by 2% year, and to decrease the number of foster youth in academic probation by 2% • Increase foster youth application to UC/CSU by 2% o Total: 3/79 o 1 student: Fall 2015 o 1 student: Fall 2016 o 1 student: Fall 2017 • Decrease number of foster youth in academic probation by 2% o Fall 2016: 14/40 = 35% good academic performance o Spring 2017: 20/22 = 90% good academic performance o Fall 2017: 13/15 = 85% good academic performance • Textbook loans were provided to low-income students, veterans, and foster youth; e.g., textbook loans helped EOPS students successfully complete courses: o Fall 2016 Grade - No. of Students A - 45 Students B - 36 Students C - 21 Students o Spring 2017 Grade - No. of Students A - 41 Students B - 38 Students C - 12 Students o Between 24-30 textbooks and 6-8 laptops were loaned to foster youth students; one foster youth nursing student was provided with 10 textbooks and the required uniform for the nursing program; meal vouchers were also provided • Through use of short, instructional videos and contextualized practice and application activities in targeted CTE trades, students receive supplemental instruction, delivered online (preferably viewable through cellular phones) to help accelerate them toward course completion o Contextualized learning modules that focus on basic math, English and ESL instruction that are trade specific have been developed o Practice and application activities are available online, on worksheets available at the Alisal Campus, and given by instructors o Community students often lack large time blocks to complete remedial instruction, but they do have 20-30 minute time blocks (between classes, before picking up children, or during work breaks) to complete contextualized instruction o Tutors, basic skills coaches, and instructors (often the proceeding 10 minutes before class) can help students with academic support and encouragement o The ultimate aim is to have contextualized basic math, English (reading and writing), and ESL lessons in a module or video library with support materials that students can access 24 hours a day • Since the program began, 386 participants have signed into the Canvas shell; of those, 35% logged in at least 10 minutes of participation, 16% for 10 minutes of interaction; 22% for over 30 minutes of interaction; 11% for over 1 hour, and 1% logged between 4 and 12 hours • Almost 150 hours of online viewing and practice (numbers include duplication; e.g., student may have been counted as participating at the 10+ minute, ½ hour and hour marks • Provides cost-effective delivery: Set-up costs are very much the same whether you develop for 1 student or 10,000 • Students like the app because it is convenient, allows for “small learning units” (5 to 10 minutes, anonymity, free, easy-user interface, mobile, tech-oriented, instant feedback on quizzes, relates to students’ trades o Assessment of the program has indicated that more course-specific applications are needed, mobile application technology needs to “catch up” with desktop technology, and onboarding of participating faculty needs to improve o Four models to continue the program are being reviewed Course Completion Activity 3: Provide low-income students with computer literacy training and basic skills support by creating a laptop loan program that will increase access to technology for impacted students. Supplement Computer Center hours to provide access for students needing technology support (computer literacy skills) to complete coursework (In Progress - Ongoing) • A laptop loan program and charge-out system (contract) has been established. Students may borrow laptops from the College’s Library • Computer Center hours have been expanded four hours a week in the afternoons to provide assistance to students needing additional technology support • The College has been piloting Technology Readiness Courses (Levels 1, 2, and 3 in six-week, four-hour sessions as part of its adult education offerings to train students in computer and Internet terminology and concepts, keyboarding, and basic computer applications o Course enrollment and completion rates continue to increase to approximately 35-40 students per session o Courses were offered in Spanish only as not-for-credit o These courses were submitted as noncredit curriculum to the Chancellors Office in Spring 2017 o The college will be applying for Noncredit SSSP funding for the next academic year Course Completion Activity 4:Increase participation in the Math Academy for impacted students to increase success and persistence through the math sequence (Completed – Ongoing) • Since 2011, Math Academy participants have shown significantly higher success rates in their subsequent math courses; for example, success in MAT 123, Intermediate Algebra, has ranged from 15 to 29 percentage points higher than non-Math Academy participants. In MAT 201, Pre-Algebra, Math Academy participants have demonstrated success at between 5 to 26 points higher than non-Math Academy students. However, data show that results for success in MAT 121 have been lower for MAT 121 Math Academy students than for those not participating. This trend is under investigation. • Targeted effective math learning support to identified groups will increase completion of the math sequence, leading to higher transfer rates o During the Winter 17 Math Academy, the following success rates (those passing a math class after participating in the Math Academy)were observed: MAT 201: 72% MAT 121: 80% MAT 123: 69% MAT 3A: 69% MAT 13: 100% MAT 24/25: 50% o During the Winter 14 Math Academy, the following success rates (those passing a math class after participating in the Math Academy)were observed: MAT 201: 71% MAT 121: 64% MAT 123: 88% MAT 3A: 69% MAT 13: NA (not offered in 2014) MAT 25: 70% o Hartnell College has been offering Summer and Winter Math Academies since Fall 2011 o Evaluation of the Math Academy is conducted following each academy o Noncredit courses have been created to better track students, to offer students more consistent instruction, and to institutionalize the Math Academy (Math Academy timelines are affected by semester breaks and capacity) o Math Academy scheduling is being adjusted to align with pedagogical best practices and semester breaks, which vary in length • Math faculty course leads will collect and assess data to assist in determining effective Math Academy scheduling Course Completion Activity 5: Expand the Early Support (Early Alert) Program (ESP) pilot to include more impacted students (In Progress – Ongoing) • As a result of increased hiring, the Hartnell College Counseling Department has been able to serve an increasing number of students over the last three academic years with the highest number of students served in Academic Year 16-17. From August 1, 2016 to April 25, 2017, a total number of 6,811 students have been served by counselors • The Counseling Department provides equitable access to services at the Main Campus, Alisal Campus, and King City Educational Center. In addition, the Counseling Department provides academic counseling access at Peacock Acres, a community-based foster youth serving organization, Juvenile Hall, and Salinas Valley State Prison. Counselors provide email and telephone appointment services to students and in the spring 2017, the Counseling Department is piloting the live-chat counseling function through Cranium Café (live chat) • Students who are participants in student support programs, e.g. High School Equivalency Program (HEP), evening ESL students, and other programs have access to designated Academic Counselors, who are funded by the SSSP program administered through the Counseling Department • Collaboration among ESP counselors and faculty to access student grades through Canvas for early academic intervention and support Course Completion Activity 6: Recruit impacted students into a mentorship program that includes computer literacy and basic skills support. Create a laptop loan program that will increase access to technology for students who do not have it. Supplement Computer Center hours to provide access for male and Latino students as well as for students with disabilities needing tech support (computer literacy skills) to complete coursework (In Progress – Ongoing) • A DSP&S compatible computer has been installed next to the zoom reader on the first floor outside A152. A request was made by a student who said it would be useful to be able to use a computer while reading texts on the zoom reader; this was supported by SEP funds and our IT Department. The next project is to get a new monitor for the zoom reader • The College is investigating establishing an Umoja Program Scholars program at Hartnell College to develop an exposure to a network of Historical Black colleges and help with admissions and transfer procedures for interested students and to explore creating a UMOJA summer bridge series that would include ENG 253, MAT 201, and COU 1 • Laptop loans are available to students through the Hartnell College Library • Computer Center hours have been increased four hours a week to support students with disabilities at a time when the Computer Center is less populated to allow for more individualized assistance • In 2017, the Mi CASA Center opened to provide counseling and comprehensive student support services to DREAMer students as well as all of the other students served under Special Programs (ACE, MILE, and WELI). The opening of the Mi CASA Student Center allows Mi CASA to increase capacity while maintaining confidential student appointments in the adjacent Mi CASA Office Course Completion Activity 7: Determine and analyze the “barrier points” preventing students from persisting through the levels of basic skills and ESL courses to transfer-level courses and create “momentum points” to help students succeed (In Progress – Ongoing) • Workshop Wednesdays consists of a series of workshops offered to EOPS/CARE/CalWORKs students on Wednesdays from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. o The workshop topics range from overcoming math anxiety, scholarship applications, raising emotionally healthy children, crime and violence, team-building and stress management o Overcoming public speaking anxiety is a workshop that many students have requested; a workshop was presented by a Hartnell instructor, who addressed how body language shapes who we are. “High power poses” were discussed; the workshop was interactive and students left with techniques they can use when in class, while attending a parent-teacher conference, a job interview or any other circumstance, which requires students to speak in front of others • The workshop concluded with students working in pairs and preparing an impromptu 2-minute speech on a topic of their choice. Allowing students to present to a peer on a topic they care about is critical to easing their nervousness • Workshops are provided through the Panther Learning Labs and other student support departments on campus, such as EOPS, TRiO, and DSP&S Course Completion Activity 8: Collaborate with the Director of Student Academic Support to create professional development activities (such as Faculty Inquiry Groups) to determine and analyze the “barrier points” preventing students from persisting through the levels of basic skills and ESL courses to transfer-level courses and to create “momentum points” to help students succeed. Academic support services will establish several well-organized venues to help students improve their success rate and reduce attrition. Work with faculty to create workshops for ESL and basic skills math and English courses to increase student success (In Progress – Ongoing) • Faculty have participated in professional development activities to increase student retention such as Reading Apprenticeship training, ESCALA (best practices in pedagogy) training, web accessibility training, California Acceleration Project Training, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching conferences, 3CSN workshops, CATESOL, etc. • A Noncredit Task Force was established in Fall 2017 to develop strategies and processes as noncredit classes are included in Hartnell’s curriculum. Faculty and staff have attended professional development activities to support noncredit course development • Noncredit English, math, and basic technology courses have been developed • Workshops are provided through the Panther Learning Labs and other student support departments on campus, such as EOPS, TRiO, and DSP&S Course Completion Activity 9: Increase embedded counselor support in basic skills courses with focus on reaching out to impacted students (In Progress – Ongoing) • Counselors have been embedded in remedial math and English courses • With the addition of Starfish software, improved scaling of embedded counselors will increase • Counselors and faculty hold office hours in the Panther Learning Lab to assist students Course Completion Activity 10: Provide internship opportunities relevant to Latino students’ majors to facilitate the completion of coursework (In Progress – Ongoing) • In Fall 2017, a Coordinator of Job and Internship Placement for Career Technical Education – Workforce Development was hired to establish a job placement center focusing on student workforce education, internship opportunities, and job placement • Over 100 students complete STEM research internships each year Course Completion Activity 11: Expand access to Reading Plus by hiring a part time staff member to facilitate a student orientation to the software as well as collaborate with faculty to promote access to the program and integration with courses. Utilize distance learning technology to leverage resources (Ongoing – Replaced) • This activity has been replaced by additional faculty participation in Reading Apprentice (RA) activities and a focus on Habits of Mind activities and RA concepts supported by the Student Success Committee; e.g., several book clubs will begin meeting in Spring 2018 to reflect on the book Grit by Angela Duckworth (who donated money to Hartnell College for this activity) • In August 2017, the Reading & Writing Academy was offered to students in one level and two levels below English to help prepare students for transfer-level English by teaching effective reading and writing strategies. The curriculum from the Academy is being considered for workshop or noncredit course development.

Data to Support 2015-16 Course Completion Progress:

Gender Race/Gender/Special Group Course Completion Remedial Math Remedial English Remedial ESL All Students American Indian/Alaska Native N/A All Students Asian (including Filipino) -1 All Students Asian (excluding Filipino) -11 -4 All Students Black or African/American -2 -11 -15 N/A All Students Filipino N/A All Students Hispanic or Latino -4 All Students Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander -4 -1 N/A All Students More than one race -4 N/A All Students Some other race N/A N/A N/A N/A All Students White -3 -3 -19 All Students Unknown Race -1 -9 All Students Males -6 -4 -13 All Students Females All Students Unknown Gender -4 N/A All Students Current or former foster youth -44 N/A N/A N/A All Students Individuals with disabilities -6 -11 -2 All Students Low-income students N/A All Students Veterans N/A N/A N/A N/A All Students Undocumented Students N/A N/A N/A N/A Legend: No evidence of disproportionate impact Disproportionate impact may exist--examine to determine if systemic or anomaly Disproportionate impact does exist--examine and determine interventions

Integrated Goal 3: Time to Completion (Degree and Certificate Completion) • To shorten length of time to completion and units attempted and completed in goal completion 2017-19 Integrated Plan Activities for Time to Completion (Degree and Certificate Completion): • To develop guided pathways and ensure that appropriate student and academic support is available to students at all campus locations • To develop course schedules that promote degree and certificate completion 2017-2019 Budgeted Resources: $362,500

2015-16 Integrated SSSP, SE, and BSI Degree and Certificate Completion Goal: • To improve degree and certificate completion for the following target populations identified in the college research as experiencing a disproportionate impact Impacted Groups: Low-income students, Veterans, Whites, Males, Latinos, AB540 students, Foster Youth, Black or African American TRiO, and EOPS students, Latinos, and Students with disabilities, American Indian/Alaska Native Allocation: $137,755.20 Previous Degree & Certificate Completion Activities Degree & Certificate Completion Activity 1: Recruit impacted students into a mentorship program that includes computer literacy and basic skills support. Create a laptop loan program that will increase access to technology for students who do not have it. Supplement Computer Center hours to provide access for male and Latino students as well as for students with disabilities needing tech support (computer literacy skills) to complete coursework (Completed – Ongoing) • A laptop loan program and charge-out system (contract) has been established. Students may borrow laptops from the College’s Library • Computer Center hours have been expanded four hours a week in the afternoons to provide assistance to students needing additional technology support Degree & Certificate Completion Activity 2: Collaborate with the Director of Student Academic Support to create professional development activities (such as Faculty Inquiry Groups) to determine and analyze the “barrier points” preventing students from persisting through the levels of basic skills and ESL courses to transfer-level courses and to create “momentum points” to help students succeed (In Progress – Ongoing) • Faculty have participated in professional development activities to increase student retention such as Reading Apprenticeship training, ESCALA (best practices in pedagogy) training, web accessibility training, California Acceleration Project Training, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching conferences, 3CSN workshops, CATESOL, etc. • A Noncredit Task force ESL was established in Fall 2017 to develop strategies and processes as noncredit classes are included in Hartnell’s curriculum. Faculty and staff have attended professional development activities to support basis skills course development • Noncredit English, math, and basic technology courses have been developed • Workshops are provided through the Panther Learning Labs and other student support departments on campus, such as EOPS, TRiO, and DSP&S Degree & Certificate Completion Activity 3: Promote institutional (academic and student) support programs and use of the College’s Transfer Center to impacted students to improve students’ academic persistence and transition from basic skills courses to degree applicable/ transferable courses, and to transfer (Completed – Ongoing) • In Fall 2017, the Transfer and Career Center facilitated 13 workshops and assisted over 400 students applying to universities • Laptops with cameras are available in the Transfer Center for students to Skype with transfer institutions • Each November, Hartnell College serves as host to more than 2,000 students and families as they visit with more than 40 university and college exhibitors for Hartnell’s Annual Transfer Day and College Night. Representatives from UCs, CSUs, private and out-of-state universities greet students and share valuable information, such as: student life, financial aid, and degree programs at their respective institutions. o The Transfer and Career Center offers students the opportunity to participate in Financial Aid workshops and a special Transfer Application Workshop designed for DREAMers • Six students participated in the tour of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) to Bowie University, Lincoln University, Morgan State University, Hampton University, Norfolk State University, North Carolina A & T University, Bennett College and Howard University o Students who participated on the HBCU tour received assistance/mentoring from Hartnell counselors throughout their HBCU admissions process; participated in transfer workshops prior to the trip; received math and English tutoring services when needed • In February 2017, a group of 30 Hartnell College students attended a field trip to UC Santa Cruz chaperoned by Hartnell counselors; in March 2017, over 40 students attended a field trip to Sacramento State University; also in March 2017, a group of 40 students attended a field trip to Fresno State University. All groups participated in a guided campus tour and admissions presentation and were greeted by current UCSC/Sac State/Fresno State students who shared their experience at UCSC/Sac State/Fresno State and answered questions from our students o The groups of students who participated included members of EOPS, Guardian Scholars, TRiO, MESA, DSPS and Mi CASA – some of who have already been admitted to UCSC/Sac State/Fresno State Degree & Certificate Completion Activity 4: Strengthen transfer partnerships and programs at the community college level and with public colleges and university transfer programs at the California State University and University of California systems (Completed – Ongoing) • The December 14, 2017, edition of Diverse Issues in Higher Education featured the ‘Top 100 Associate Degree Producers’ report about community colleges that have experienced the most success in awarding degrees to minority students. o This report, based on U.S. Department of Education data, examines degree attainment by fields of study for African-American, Asian American, Hispanic, and Native American students o For the 2015-16 academic year, Hartnell College had the ninth highest percentage (89%) of minority student graduates for community colleges across the nation of over 1,400 community colleges. Hartnell had the fourth highest percentage of minority student graduates for community colleges in California (114 total colleges) • In May 2017, Hartnell College had its largest graduating class and transferred more students to four-year institutions in its history • MESA helps more than 100 first-generation college students transfer to universities each year • In Fall 2016, Hartnell College had the largest number of transfers (80) in its history to the University of California o The transfer of 80 students represents a 35.6% increase over the previous year (59), which includes a record 11 transfers to UC Berkeley, 10 of whom are Hispanic/Latino students o Of the 80 total transfers, 75% were Hispanic/Latino students placing Hartnell College as one of the colleges with the highest rate of transfer for underrepresented minorities for the entire California Community College's system of 113 colleges o Prior to fall 2016, the highest number of transfers any year since 1994-95 to UC Berkeley was 6 • The Student Support Services/TRIO Program had 64 students total graduating and transferring in both Fall 2016 and Spring 2017. This is the largest group that Student Support Services/TRiO has ever graduated and transferred in the 12 years that SSS/TRIO has been established at Hartnell College Degree & Certificate Completion Activity 5: Increase participation in the Math Academy for impacted students to increase success and persistence through the math sequence to transfer level to move through the math sequence to transfer level (Completed – Ongoing) • Since 2011, Math Academy participants have shown significantly higher success rates in their subsequent math courses; for example, success in MAT 123, Intermediate Algebra, has ranged from 15 to 29 percentage points higher than non-Math Academy participants. In MAT 201, Pre-Algebra, Math Academy participants have demonstrated success at between 5 to 26 points higher than non-Math Academy students. However, data show that results for success in MAT 121 have been lower for MAT 121 Math Academy students than for those not participating. This trend is under investigation. • Targeted effective math learning support to identified groups will increase completion of the math sequence, leading to higher transfer rates o During the Winter 17 Math Academy, the following success rates (those passing a math class after participating in the Math Academy)were observed: MAT 201: 72% MAT 121: 80% MAT 123: 69% MAT 3A: 69% MAT 13: 100% MAT 24/25: 50% o During the Winter 14 Math Academy, the following success rates (those passing a math class after participating in the Math Academy)were observed: MAT 201: 71% MAT 121: 64% MAT 123: 88% MAT 3A: 69% MAT 13: NA (not offered in 2014) MAT 25: 70% o Hartnell College has been offering Summer and Winter Math Academies since Fall 2011 o Evaluation of the Math Academy is conducted following each academy o Noncredit courses have been created to better track students, to offer students more consistent instruction, and to institutionalize the Math Academy (Math Academy timelines are affected by semester breaks and capacity) o Math Academy scheduling is being adjusted to align with pedagogical best practices and semester breaks, which vary in length • Math faculty course leads will collect and assess data to assist in determining effective Math Academy scheduling

Data to Support 2015-16 Degree and Certificate Completion Progress:

Gender Race/Gender/Special Group Degree Certificate Degree & Certificate All Students American Indian/Alaska Native N/A N/A N/A All Students Asian (including Filipino) All Students Asian (excluding Filipino) -2 -16 -4 All Students Black or African/American -6 -7 All Students Filipino All Students Hispanic or Latino All Students Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander -16 All Students More than one race -10 -3 -7 All Students Some other race N/A N/A N/A All Students White -3 All Students Unknown Race All Students Males -1 -2 -1 All Students Females All Students Unknown Gender All Students Current or former foster youth N/A N/A N/A All Students Individuals with disabilities -3 -3 All Students Low-income students All Students Veterans N/A N/A N/A All Students Undocumented Students N/A N/A N/A Legend: No evidence of disproportionate impact Disproportionate impact may exist--examine to determine if systemic or anomaly Disproportionate impact does exist--examine and determine interventions

 

Integrated Goal 4: Career Readiness • To increase career readiness and placement rates through delivery of comprehensive opportunities and services 2017-19 Integrated Plan Activities for Career Readiness: • To provide CTE course schedules that align with student needs • To provide contextualization in English and math offerings to support career readiness and alignment with industry standards • To increase external opportunities, such as Cooperative Work Experience, to enhance students’ technical and workplace skills to better prepare them for the workplace 2017-2019 Budgeted Resources: $300,724

2014-17 Integrated SSSP, SE, and BSI Career Readiness Goal: • To increase student access and success by providing all entering students with core SSSP services to assist them in achieving their educational and career goals Impacted Groups: Low-income students, Veterans, Whites, Males, Latinos, AB540 students, Foster Youth, Latinos, and Students with disabilities Allocation: $274,479.20 Previous Career Readiness Activities: $242,755.20 Career Readiness Activity 1: Provide at least an abbreviated student education plan (SEP) to all entering students with a priority focus on students who enroll to earn degrees, career technical certificates, transfer preparation, or career advancement (Completed – Ongoing) • Increase the number of scheduled COU 1 courses. In academic year 2014-2015, the Hartnell College Counseling Department increased the number of COU 1, Student Success Seminar, courses offered each semester to 15 sections total per semester across the three campus locations. o Fifteen sections district-wide provide a total enrollment capacity of 525 students in COU 1, which teaches many of the student success skills necessary for students to navigate college and develop an educational goal based on their career interests o A key student learning outcome (SLO) of these courses is the development of a comprehensive educational plan o Educational planning workshops are offered three times a week including Saturdays to provide orientation and academic and career counseling to students o If the student is unsure of his/her major, career counseling is offered in a variety of forms: The Student Success Seminar (COU 1) class with a career counseling component, the Career Development class (COU 23), or referral to the Career Center • Maintain comprehensive partnerships with all feeder high schools in Monterey County, adult schools, alternative schools, community based organizations, one-stop career centers, foster youth serving organizations, migrant serving organizations, Monterey County Office of Education, the Department of Social Services, and campus departments/organizations o Hartnell College is a member of and the fiscal agent for the Salinas Valley Adult Education Consortium, where it collaborates with area adult schools and MCOE to examine educational and career gaps o In Fall 2017, a Coordinator of Job and Internship Placement for Career Technical Education – Workforce Development was hired to establish a job placement center focusing on student workforce education, internship opportunities, and job placement o The Transfer and Career Center in collaboration with the Veteran’s Service Center held its Fifth Annual Veterans Appreciation Job Fair in October 2017 in the Student Center with more than 30 employers and over 400 participants o Over 100 students complete STEM research internships each year • Work to increase awareness of post-secondary education and/or career opportunities at Hartnell College. o The Transfer and Career Center provides guidance in university transfer information, career exploration, and job preparation. Services include academic counseling, transfer and career workshops, and a self-guided career planner. For example, the Transfer/Career Center organized Psychology major and Sociology major workshops to educate students in careers and preparation for these majors o The College Pathways team will facilitate the process of enrollment for graduating high school seniors and or equivalent and participate in various MCOE-sponsored events such as Career and Resource Fairs held throughout the year o The College Pathways team has worked closely with the John Muir Career Pathways Coordinator at Rancho Cielo to assist students through the Steps to Success process of enrollment to ensure students meet enrollment deadlines o The College Pathways team is also in collaboration with John Muir staff to identify a seamless transition from the John Muir Construction Academy into the Sustainable Construction certificate or degree program at Hartnell College upon completion at Rancho Cielo (a current outreach partner in Salinas). They also provide support services, vocational training and job placement services o The Boy’s and Girl’s Club of Monterey County is a current outreach partner through which Hartnell participates in Career Fair and Community Resource fairs Career Readiness Activity 2: Inform staff and students of career opportunities/career preparation (In Progress – Ongoing) • Representatives from Gonzales School District, Salinas Union High School District, Monterey Bay Economic Partnership, Monterey County Workforce Development Board, and Hartnell College participated in a collaborative and interactive Labor Market Training as part of a workforce and economic development project for the Salinas Valley. o The five cities of the Salinas Valley—Gonzales, Greenfield, King City, Salinas, and Soledad are collaborating on this innovative initiative to address the workforce, education, and training assets in their communities and to develop sector partnerships in two of the largest sectors in the region: healthcare and agriculture • The Independent Living Program of Monterey County, in partnership with our Foster and Kinship Care Education (FKCE) Program, sponsored an annual event, Depart Smart in April 2017 o Depart Smart is a hands-on interactive fair to increase awareness and understanding for job readiness and independent living for foster and probationary youth within the ages of 14 and 21 o There were 25 attendees, 22 volunteers, and 10 staff who participated in the fair, which included topics such as: nutrition, physical health and mindfulness, navigating education, budgeting, “adulting” responsibilities, communication, and social media tips o Participants were provided with professional clothing for men and women to take, opportunities for mock interviews, computers for resume building, informative pamphlets, and motivational advice from two former foster youth up on stage • The annual Spring Career Fair was held in April 2017 and provided over 250 students and community members with the opportunity to network with about 40 employers who are currently recruiting o The diverse group of employers recruiting for jobs and internships ranged from Police Departments (Seaside, Salinas, and San Jose), Delicato Family Vineyards, Ecology Action, and Monterey Bay Aquarium, to Marich Confectionery, TV stations, accounting firms, and Boys and Girls Club of Monterey County • Over 90% of 160 CTE student survey respondents were satisfied with the education and training they received at Hartnell College and found employment after completing their studies based on a survey conducted by the RP Group in 2013-14

Career & Technical Education (CTE) Employment Outcomes Survey 2017 Hartnell College Completer and skills-building students at Hartnell College were surveyed if they met one of the following criteria in 2014-2015, and did not enroll (or were minimally enrolled) in 2015-2016: earned a certificate of 6 or more units, earned a vocational degree, or earned 9+ CTE units. The survey was administered in early 2017 by e-mail, text message (SMS), and telephone. The survey addressed student perceptions of their CTE program, employment outcomes, and how their coursework and training relate to their current career. A total of 635 students were surveyed and 237 (37%) students responded: 34% by email, 10% by SMS, and 56% by phone.

How satisfied are students with the education and training they received?

How many hours per week are employed students working? How many students secured a job that is closely related to their program of study?

How many months did it take for students to find a job? What were the hourly wages of the students before training versus after training?

What were the hourly wages of transfer students and non-transfer students—before training versus after training?

Does the similarity between job and program of study influence wage gains? What is your current employment status?

More Key Results

$8.95 is the overall change in hourly wages after completing training—in dollars 81% is the overall change in hourly wages after completing training—in percentage gain 77% of respondents reported being employed for pay 40% of respondents reported transferring to another college or university 88% of respondents reported being very satisfied or satisfied with their training.

Conclusion The results of the survey showed that completing CTE studies and training – whether or not a credential is earned, whether or not a student transfers – is related to positive employment outcomes. The preponderance of respondents are employed and are working in the same field as their studies or training. Notably, students realize a greater wage gain after completing their studies if they secure a job that is similar to their program of study.   Integrated Goal 5: Goal: Transfer Readiness • To increase transfer rates to public and private universities 2017-19 Integrated Plan Activities for Transfer Readiness: • To promote awareness and use of the College’s Transfer Center • To increase the number of services and students who receive services from Hartnell College Transfer Center 2017-2019 Budgeted Resources: $320,000

Integrated Goal 5: Transfer Readiness: • To improve transfer for the following target populations identified in the college research as experiencing a disproportionate impact Impacted Groups: Individuals with disabilities, American Indian/Alaskan Natives, Females, Foster Youth, Low-income students Allocation: $242,755.20 Previous Transfer Activities Transfer Activity 1: Promote institutional (academic and student) support programs and use of the College’s Transfer Center to impacted students to improve students’ academic persistence and transition from basic skills courses to degree applicable/ transferable courses, and to transfer • In Fall 2017, the Transfer and Career Center facilitated 13 workshops and assisted over 400 students applying to universities • Laptops with cameras are available in the Transfer Center for students to Skype with transfer institutions • Each November, Hartnell College serves as host to more than 2,000 students and families as they visit with more than 40 university and college exhibitors for Hartnell’s Annual Transfer Day and College Night. Representatives from UCs, CSUs, private and out-of-state universities greet students and share valuable information, such as: student life, financial aid, and degree programs at their respective institutions. o The Transfer and Career Center offers students the opportunity to participate in Financial Aid workshops and a special Transfer Application Workshop designed for DREAMers. • Six students participated in the tour of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) to Bowie University, Lincoln University, Morgan State University, Hampton University, Norfolk State University, North Carolina A & T University, Bennett College and Howard University o Students who participated on the HBCU tour received assistance/mentoring from Hartnell counselors throughout their HBCU admissions process; participated in transfer workshops prior to the trip; received math and English tutoring services when needed • In February 2017, a group of 30 Hartnell College students attended a field trip to UC Santa Cruz chaperoned by Hartnell counselors; in March 2017, over 40 students attended a field trip to Sacramento State University; also in March 2017, a group of 40 students attended a field trip to Fresno State University. All groups participated in a guided campus tour and admissions presentation and were greeted by current UCSC/Sac State/Fresno State students who shared their experience at UCSC/Sac State/Fresno State and answered questions from our students o The groups of students who participated included members of EOPS, Guardian Scholars, TRiO, MESA, DSPS and Mi CASA – some of who have already been admitted to UCSC/Sac State/Fresno State • Financial literacy workshops are provided to help students to financially manage their transfer Transfer Activity 2: Strengthen transfer partnerships and programs at the community college level and with public colleges and university transfer programs at the California State University and University of California systems (Completed – Ongoing) • The December 14, 2017, edition of Diverse Issues in Higher Education featured the ‘Top 100 Associate Degree Producers’ report about community colleges that have experienced the most success in awarding degrees to minority students. o This report, based on U.S. Department of Education data, examines degree attainment by fields of study for African-American, Asian American, Hispanic, and Native American students o For the 2015-16 academic year, Hartnell College had the ninth highest percentage (89%) of minority student graduates for community colleges across the nation of over 1,400 community colleges. Hartnell had the fourth highest percentage of minority student graduates for community colleges in California (114 total colleges) • In May 2017, Hartnell College had its largest graduating class and transferred more students to four-year institutions in its history • MESA helps more than 100 first-generation college students transfer to universities each year • In Fall 2016, Hartnell College had the largest number of transfers (80) in its history to the University of California o The transfer of 80 students represents a 35.6% increase over the previous year (59), which includes a record 11 transfers to UC Berkeley, 10 of whom are Hispanic/Latino students o Of the 80 total transfers, 75% were Hispanic/Latino students placing Hartnell College as one of the colleges with the highest rate of transfer for underrepresented minorities for the entire California Community College's system of 113 colleges o Prior to fall 2016, the highest number of transfers any year since 1994-95 to UC Berkeley was 6 • The Student Support Services/TRIO Program had 64 students total graduating and transferring in both Fall 2016 and Spring 2017. This is the largest group that Student Support Services/TRiO has ever graduated and transferred in the 12 years that SSS/TRIO has been established at Hartnell College Transfer Activity 3: Increase participation in the Math Academy for impacted students to increase success and persistence through the math sequence to transfer level • Targeted effective math learning support to identified groups will increase completion of the math sequence, leading to higher transfer rates o During the Winter 17 Math Academy, the following success rates (those passing a math class after participating in the Math Academy)were observed: MAT 201: 72% MAT 121: 80% MAT 123: 69% MAT 3A: 69% MAT 13: 100% MAT 24/25: 50% o During the Winter 14 Math Academy, the following success rates (those passing a math class after participating in the Math Academy)were observed: MAT 201: 71% MAT 121: 64% MAT 123: 88% MAT 3A: 69% MAT 13: NA (not offered in 2014) MAT 25: 70% o Hartnell College has been offering Summer and Winter Math Academies since Fall 2011 o Evaluation of the Math Academy is conducted following each academy o Noncredit courses have been created to better track students, to offer students more consistent instruction, and to institutionalize the Math Academy (Math Academy timelines are affected by semester breaks and capacity) o Math Academy scheduling is being adjusted to align with pedagogical best practices and semester breaks, which vary in length o Math faculty course leads will collect and assess data to assist in determining effective Math Academy scheduling   Data to Support 2015-16 Transfer Progress:

Gender Race/Gender/Special Group Transfer All Students American Indian/Alaska Native -5 All Students Asian (including Filipino) -3 All Students Asian (excluding Filipino) All Students Black or African/American All Students Filipino -9 All Students Hispanic or Latino -1 All Students Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander -30 All Students More than one race All Students Some other race N/A All Students White All Students Unknown Race All Students Males -1 All Students Females All Students Unknown Gender -30 All Students Current or former foster Youth N/A All Students Individuals with disabilities -16 All Students Low-income students All Students Veterans N/A All Students Undocumented Students N/A Legend: No evidence of disproportionate impact Disproportionate impact may exist--examine to determine if systemic or anomaly Disproportionate impact does exist--examine and determine interventions